Creativity Reading Response 15: Based in history

There was a book I had to read/use multiple times for summer reading assignments for my honors English classes in high school called How to Read Literature like a Professor that had multiple chapters over how almost all literature alludes or draws from the Bible, Shakespeare, etc. I know from studying fashion that almost all clothing that goes down the runway is part of a cycle of a trend that was around maybe 20 or so years ago. They are all creative takes on tried and true stories and outfits, but they aren’t completely original. It’s hard for anything to be completely original as we continue to build upon existing technologies.

Ogle says in Smart World how we are all “children of the Renaissance” (56). According to the reading, “we all routinely rely on a whole web of cultural and social practices and knowledge to guide our behavior” (54). It makes sense, honestly. We all use experts or models to help us figure out what might be the best path for us to solve our own problems or create something of our own. Even basic creative enterprises, such as crafting or knitting, have people using patterns or tried and true techniques and stitches. These give us the base to be able to play, develop and be creative. It’s hard to conceptualize a house until you have the foundation laid (or at least know how big that will be).

For us to go forward into the future we have to be able to learn from the past. Geniuses like Einstein, etc. learned from their predecessors and in turn we must use what they gave us to create a new tomorrow. The possibility of flying cars can’t even be thought of if it weren’t for Da Vinci thinking that humans could fly in the first place.

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Creativity Reading Response 14: Mathletes

I am not awful at math. I actually was in honors math classes in high school but they weren’t the highest level I could’ve been at. My brother who is a year younger than me was in the same classes at the same time. Actually, all three of my brothers have been better at math than me all of my life, so I have always shied away from fit because it never felt like my place. I found it interesting that Piirto said that “first-borns make up more than half of active scientists” because I am a first born but all of my younger siblings are definitely more science-minded than me (257). I could always edit their papers or do other more creative pursuits.

I guess, technically, math and science can be considered creative. Piirto in Understanding Creativity talks about the process of mathematical insight, saying: “First there is the mental preparation. Second is the incubation. Third is the illumination. Fourth is the verification” (253). This is very similar to how you go through creative processes and creative problem solving. You use arts and math to solve a variety of problems and math formulas are innately creative. How? Because someone had to go about many different processes to figure out what could best work consistently to explain phenomena.

Gender has been tied to arts vs. math since the beginning of time, which I think has entirely to do with how we are socialized. Women are not consistently welcomed into the STEM sphere, which affects how much they want to develop their ability in those areas or not. Piirto says it has to do do with how more women are low in ego-assertiveness and most men are high in it, thus women don’t have “the drive” for math and science. I think that has completely everything to do with the fact that men have always been given more of a voice in the classroom and workplace. Most young girls feel unsure or turned away from STEM by the time they hit middle school because they are pushed to be more artsy and let the boys be good at math. I think the world needs more of the scientific and mathematical creativity that women bring to the table since they view things in different ways than men.

Creativity isn’t really defined by subject matter, so those subject matters shouldn’t try to define who can be creative within them.

Creativity Reflection 14: Sweet Home Chicago

I almost cried when I pulled into Chicago for my friend’s fraternity formal. Sure, maybe some of it might’ve been due to the fact that I was tipsy from drinking on the bus ride up, but this is the place I feel the happiest and the most creative.

I am inspired by the skyline and how it varies in shapes and sizes. It is historic and dynamic all at the same time. Lights were documenting the city being NFL Draft Town and Grant Park was transformed to a football paradise (which had me hyped more than anything). It is amazing to see how they creatively used this park space for multiple events throughout the year. It is forever changing and I never feel like I am entering the same park twice because of Taste of Chicago, Lollapalooza and other events.

These events bring more people to the city and the city absorbs their actions, inspirations and feelings to continually adapt and be more vibrant with each passing day. No matter the season, the reflective view from The Bean, or Cloudgate as known to very few, is always beautiful. I am honestly in love with it most when there is a perfect snow cap atop it and the city is sparkling with ice crystals. I can feel the wind making my cheeks numb and rosy and my body feels strong against the bitter wind. Nothing makes me feel more alive.

When I was just there for formal, it rained all day on the Saturday we were there. I hate the rain but there was something so peaceful about walking through the city I knew and loved with the soft rhythm of the pitter-patter of the raindrops. It created a misty fog that hid the tops of the buildings from view and made me daydream about the kind of mythical creatures hiding in the precipitation.

This is my place. It is my forever home.

Creativity Class Reflection 14: Creative competition

I am a pretty judgmental person. My Meyers-Briggs personality type is ENTJ with that J standing for judgment. I use standards for almost anything I do. I subconsciously will compete with my peers because I have a hard time figuring out quality without some sort measuring tool.

When it comes to creativity, it is hard to do that. But, we had a guest speaker that made us judge different things and pick the most creative. First it was different running shoes and my little group of three people looked at shoes that we found to be the most innovative or unlike what is already on the market to determine what is the most creative. A couple other groups agreed with us, which shows how creativity can viewed similarly for products that we all have a lot of work with.

We then had to look at Olympic logos. This was interesting because some of the newer ones are things that we have seen shared and critiqued on social media, which could cloud how “creative” we considered them. Instead of using things like innovation as a judging factor, we considered how well the logos integrated the idea of people/countries being together and the colors of the rings. We were more attracted to ones that didn’t look exactly like rings because it seemed easy to just shove the Olympic rings somewhere and call it a day.

The last things we had to judge was probably the hardest and it was Apple products. My group made arguments for a couple different products for being the most creative based on if it was the first of it’s kind or if it revolutionized the current technologies. Our choices would probably be very different than our parents since we have  grown up with more computers and similar technologies than they have.

This class really made me stretch what I thought about creativity since I alway just considered a black and white you are creative or you aren’t. But this helped me realize that you can think of legit factors that you can qualify what makes something creative or not. It is similar to how I approach word choice in stories because there are always so many better words than unique that can actually qualify whatever you are trying to describe.

Creativity Reflection 13: Hair-brained

I am identified by hair quite frequently now. It’s strange to think that since that was never a thing about four years. My hair wasn’t special. It wasn’t ugly, but it just wasn’t notable.

But now my hair is very me.

It’s short and spunky. I now have an undercut that makes the sides of my head fuzzy like a puppy. My hair is never the same color all year round. It’s constantly slightly changing. Cutting it all off after my high school graduation was like a creative way of marking my life transitioning. It was also to prove a point to my shitty boyfriend that I would still look hot.

The color of my hair has really always been fascinating since I don’t dye it. It just just changes in the sun, pick up bright blonde highlights that trickle down to my dark eyebrows to make them salt-and-pepper colored. It reflects to a young, baby Vee with hair the color of sunned straw. Blonde is the color that makes me happiest and Winter brings a brown that makes me look sallow in the face. I get this ever-changing color from my daddy, whose hair is now a permanent brown that only sees peeks of blonde when he stays in tropical locations for work trips and in his eyelashes.

Recently, people have been complimenting me on my dark hair and asking when I dyed it. I didn’t. I am slightly horrified that they are saying how dark it is. My hair was so blonde from a summer of being in the sun daily walking around campus as a Summer Welcome Leader that the fact that it hasn’t started shedding it’s winter layers/my haircuts have been revealing the areas the sun hasn’t seen is kind of a drastic change. I have always identified as a blonde, heck, I buy John Frieda Blonde shampoo. I liked the cliche of blondes having more fun because I felt lighter and happier when my hair was blonder.

But, stupid, silly, cliche me was forgetting the point of what people were saying to me. They were complimenting me. Telling me I looked good. Saying I was pretty. I was creatively avoiding the positives because it was easier in the moment for me to be mad at a change I wasn’t used to then just accept people being nice to me.

My hair has always been a symbol of self love, but now it has taken on a new meaning for me to allow others to praise me when I deserve it. Humility is important but fighting compliments isn’t cute. But, thanks for telling me my hair is.

 

Creativity Class Reflection 13: Dream space

I am definitely a Googler of what dreams mean, especially after I had what is said to be a common dream about your teeth falling out. That one supposedly marks anxiety, a large transition in one’s life and, of course, Freud says it represents sexual repression. *Insert cool symbol emoji*

But, when Dr. Crespy came to talk to our class he explained that our dreams are our own. He led us through creating our very own Dream Cache out of a lunch bag in which we could write down dreams we have and put it next to our bed to be able to reflect on what our subconscious mind is whipping up. Before we could just go sleep on it (lol), he prompted us to write different things to tap into our dreaming mind. We had to write down feelings that intrigued us, people that came to mind, places that meant something to us, events that we enjoyed, etc. Then he made us blindly grab these slips of paper and create a quick dream from it. Mine wasn’t that fantastical and involved me getting with my current crush (surprise, surprise) in my stable, future home. Some of my classmates shared their written dreams and they sounded like lyrical art, but they were very true to what I knew about those people. It’s fascinating how random thoughts, feelings and things can be so representative of people’s real and unreal experiences and perspective on life.

That idea kind of bled into what we did in class after my group’s project presentation (which went amazingly). We had the Interactive Theater Troupe come in to our class and play out a scene of students discussing religious extremists. It was crazy how much my blood boiled as an actor played a devout Baptist that harped on how Muslims were scary and “the other.” It seems so obvious to me how ignorant that is, but the reality of this “fake” scenario is that there are people whose experiences have pushed them to believe something like that. It was fun to watch Lizzie, one of my classmates, interact with the scene and try to find common ground with the different characters that were all trying to shut each other down. Even though her personal experiences were a bit different than the majority of the cast, she found a way to level with all of them, which shows how everyone can connect in some way. I mean, that teeth dream must be common for a reason…

Creativity Reading Response 13: Testing, testing

When I started taking this Creativity course, the Type A, grade-conscious part of me wondered how grading would work for this class. I feel like most of my peers chirp about how they are/aren’t “that” creative, but on what scale? What made them less creative than something or someone else?

Piirto in Chapter 12 of Understanding Creativity brings up that idea. Creativity is a construct because it is something that helps makes up a person’s behavior, yet is unobservable and not directly measurable. “The lack of a universal definition for creativity — and the complexity of what is creativity — is the major problem in developing a valid test or measure,” according to Piirto (381). It’s hard to accurately assess creativity when it comes in so many different forms. In my friend group alone not one of us is creative in the same way as someone else. Cassa is creative with her writing, Christine is creative with her story ideas, Alison is creative with her approach to food, Caroline is creative in social media, Brendan is creative with his graphic designs, Hannah is creative with her witty words, Mary is creative with her numbers and yarn work, Veronike is creative with her culture and her activism and I am creative with my clothes. If you made us all take the same test, our results would be so different that it wouldn’t be able to standardize our level of creativity.

I think that is a really true testament to what I’ve learned through this course so far. In all my other academic avenues, especially in the very competitive J-school, I have felt pushed (and pushed myself) to compare myself to others and their abilities. But this class has opened so many different avenues to how I approach being creative, whether it is through song, meditation, playing with figurines, making images with my body or acting. Though I might not be amazing at all of the different things we try in class, they all increase my ability to look at things in different ways. There isn’t a right or wrong to creativity, which is hard for me to comprehend at times, but I think it is just what I needed to think out of the box.